Puppies are fluffy balls of joy. If your plan for spreading holiday cheer this year involves getting a loved one a precious pup present, be sure you are prepared for the life-long commitment. Anyone can put a bow on a puppy, but not everyone is prepared to parent. Below is a list of items to purchase and get ready before Fido’s grand entrance. Everything should be hidden from sight until the big reveal, of course.

Video courtesy of Huff Post Good News

 

WHAT TO GET

  • Food And Water Bowls
    • Purchase bowls low enough in height so that the new puppy isn’t straining to reach them. Place the bowls in a quiet place so no one pesters the pup while he or she is eating.
  • Food
    • After eight weeks, your puppy should be able to eat solid food. Select a brand of puppy food that is high in quality and a good source of protein, calcium and calories.
  • Chew Toys
    • Select toys suitable for unsupervised access. Make sure the toy is large enough so it can’t be swallowed whole and that your puppy can’t chew a piece of it off.
  • Treats
    • These will come in handy for training. We recommend using a soft moist treat that is easy to break off and chew. Most dogs are motivated by food, so use treats to reinforce your puppy’s good behavior.
  • Grooming Supplies
    • Including, but not limited to, puppy-safe shampoo, nail clippers, toothbrush, toothpaste and a brush appropriate for your dog’s type of fur.
  • Bed
    • For rest and relaxation during the day, select a bed that is machine washable and slightly off the ground.
  • Collar and Leash
    • Size these items in accordance to the size of your puppy. Smaller dogs can use lightweight collars and leashes, whereas larger dogs may need heavyweight ones. A good rule is to be able to get 4 fingers comfortably under the collar – this keeps it from being too tight or too loose.
  • Tag
    • Complete with an adorably creative name, phone number and address.
  • Crate
    • This behavior management tool aids in housetraining and prevents puppy misbehavior when you are unable to supervise. Choose a crate the puppy can stand up, turn around and lie down in with his or her legs extended and make sure there is soft bedding inside the crate.
  • Puppy pads
    • The absorbent and disposable pads are used indoors in case of potty training “accidents.”

 

DON’T FORGET! GET THE HOUSE READY

Puppy proof the area where the youngster will be spending most of his or her time during the next few months. Tape loose electrical cords to baseboards, securely store household chemicals and remove plants and breakables. If you are using puppy gates, install them to segment off dangerous or undesirable areas for your pet. Look around the floor and make sure everything is out of reach for the new puppy.

 

child hugging puppy on floor

 

P.S.

We highly recommend visiting your local shelter before selecting a puppy. No-kill nonprofit organizations like The Humane Society work to adopt affordable and loving pets that would be perfect for your family.

Once your pup gets a big older, keep us in mind for all of your pet boarding services.

Sources

http://pets.webmd.com/dogs/guide/bringing-home-new-puppy

http://www.whole-dog-journal.com/issues/8_9/features/15742-1.html

http://www.wikihow.com/Prepare-for-a-Puppy

https://www.cesarsway.com/dog-care/nutrition/puppy-feeding-guidelines

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