Huskies are equally well known for their physical endurance and their beautiful fluffy coats and blue eyes. Looking to adopt a Husky? Read on and learn if they’re the right choice for your family.

Grooming needs:

Husky ownership means a biannual blowout! That’s not a shopping sale- it’s when the dogs lose their heavy winter undercoat. Twice a year, your Husky will shed an incredible amount, leaving hair everywhere for about a week. There’s not much you can do, other than brushing out your dog’s coat once a week year-round, and once a day during a blowout. Do NOT shave your husky! Some groomers may recommend this to control shedding and cool your pup, but it will actually do the opposite- your husky’s outer coat promotes air circulation, helping them stay cool. A husky can survive the hot, Texas heat, but they should never be left outside, even in the shade, for long period of time. Never, ever leave your husky (or any dog!) in a hot car.

Temperament:

Huskies are smart and opinionated dogs. They tend not to do well off-leash, because they have a tendency to run after whatever interests them. They would also do well in a very high, sturdy fenced in area, as most huskies can easily leap over or break through inadequate fencing. Although the breed is very smart, they tend to ignore their training when it’s convenient. Huskies are good with children, when properly trained and supervised. They tend to get along well with other dogs, but will view smaller pets as prey for the chase. As pack animals, huskies thrive on your attention and need activity that bonds them with their family.

Exercise Needs:

Huskies were bred for intense work in the Arctic cold. Your husky will have a natural desire to pull and run, so be sure they have room to run around and plenty of physical activity. Huskies are good candidates for fun dog activities like hiking, swimming, and running. Huskies make unhappy apartment dogs but if you’re looking for an active, able companion, a Husky might be a good fit.

History:

Siberian huskies have a storied history. The breed first appeared in Nome, Alaska, brought by Russian trader William Goosak in 1909. Competitors criticized Goosak’s smaller dogs, calling them “Siberian Rats.” In spite of 100 to 1 odds, Goosak’s team took third in the All Alaska Sweepstakes race of 408 miles. Ever since, Huskies have been known for their incredible speed and stamina, and they’re a top choice for sled racing to this day.

Husky sled dogs

Looking for someone to take care of your Husky or other dog? At Pawderosa, we have everything to meet your dog’s specific needs, from playtime to grooming. Make sure your best friend gets the best care.

Book your dog’s stay today.

Sources:
http://huskyhaven.org/
http://www.huskypuppiesinfo.com/
http://www.shca.org/shcahp2d.htm

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